Is co-parenting right for your family?

Getting a divorce alters your life in many ways, but it does not change your responsibility to your children.

Now that the family dynamic has changed, you may need to place greater emphasis on cultivating relationships and making sure your young family members feel loved.

Co-parenting benefits

Children have a way of blaming themselves for everything that goes wrong in the world, and when their divorced parents cannot get along, they tend to carry that weight on their shoulders. If you and your ex can work together for the sake of your little ones, you can ensure the following outcomes:

  • Your children will not suffer from unnecessary stress
  • Your children will feel secure, even when they travel between homes
  • You will be setting a positive example of respect, cooperation and conflict resolution
  • Your children will have the opportunity to create strong family bonds on both sides

Barriers to effective co-parenting

In some cases, establishing and maintaining a healthy co-parenting relationship may not be possible. If your ex is combative, has a substance abuse problem or cannot provide an appropriate living condition for your children, then it may not be in the best interest of your family to share parenting time right now. It is your job as a parent to set the example for a stable life, and if your former spouse cannot commit to a collaborative child custody strategy, you may need to seek primary custody.

Amicable co-parenting is the best avenue for divorced parties to raise happy, well-adjusted children. Understanding your options is essential to planning your divorce and making custody arrangements.